Canada – Lots Of Work But Nobody Wants It

Lots of work but fewer want it as participation rate shrinks

Unless there’s a miracle medical breakthrough, the millennial generation will soon be able to stop worrying about baby boomers plugging up the job market and living in the nicest homes.

According to The Economist magazine, “Peak Death” for boomers will strike in about 2034.

“It will be very sad,” said The Economist in its cheeky style. “But for house-hunters it will be a help.”

While U.S. statistics show older people increasingly hang onto their houses as they age, the boomer effect on the job market will come much sooner and is already impacting North American employment.

Exit boomers

Friday’s job’s numbers for the month of January will provide the latest update. But data from Statistics Canada already shows that the gradual exit of those boomers from the labour force over the last ten years is having an impact on the economy that has never been seen before.

While this long goodbye has been predicted and feared for decades by demographers, there are some things about the numbers that were not foreseen and are harder to explain, said Etienne Lalé, who teaches labour economics at the Université du Québec à Montréal.

“Both in the U.S. and in Canada, the labour force participation rate has been falling over the past ten years, but the underlying reasons are quite different,” said Lalé, a specialist in how labour markets change over time.

While U.S. statistics show older people increasingly hang onto their houses as they age, the boomer effect on the job market will come much sooner and is already impacting North American employment.

While Britain, the U.S. and Canada all experienced a baby boom as soldiers came back from the Second World War and started families, the size of that demographic bulge is subtly different in the three countries. For instance, “peak death” for Canada may come a bit later than for the U.K. as mentioned in The Economist. Canadians generally live longer. – CBC

read full article here

Peak Death?  This is a real term?

Labour participation is at a new low.  Will boomers be replaced by machines instead of people?

If you replace workers with machines, then you have to find something else for those workers to do.  Other jobs. That has not happened.

There are a lot of perfectly healthy young people not working, not going to school. They are not doing anything.  Zippo. Nada. Zilch.  In return they receive free food, free housing, free medical, free dental, free clothes…. you get the picture.  Have we created a generation that does not want to work?  Have we created a generation that has no work to do?

Why do we need to bring in temporary workers?

Are there not enough unemployed in this country to fill those jobs?   Have our generous social programs made people too selective about work they are willing to do?

Nobody is against immigration.  This country was built by immigrants. What people are against is bringing in unskilled immigrants.  Today, there many skilled people from all over the world wishing to come to Canada.  THOSE are the people we need.

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One Response

  1. casper
    casper at | | Reply

    We have created a generation that want’s to start working at the top. Not willing to start at the bottom and “work” their way up. There are lots of jobs but beneath the dignity of many of our youth for various reasons. Many are relying on the wealth transfer soon to happen as boomers start to die en mass.
    There will be 136,000 skilled immigrants allowed entry from now to 2020 and 204,000 unskilled immigrants willing to work at entry level jobs. Probably not enough to support our lazy free free free everything citizens.

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