Canada – SNC-Lavalin Controversy Could Contain Key To Wilson-Raybould’s Shortcomings

SNC-Lavalin controversy could contain key to Wilson-Raybould’s shortcomings

Michael Spratt, February 11, 2019

Maybe I was wrong all along.

Maybe Jody Wilson-Raybould, Canada’s former minister of justice and attorney general, was honestly trying to follow through on the government’s progressive pre-election justice promises.

Maybe the last three-and-a-half years of inaction, bungled justice legislation and pandering to corporations was all the PMO’s doing.

The Globe and Mail’s bombshell report of alleged political interference by the PMO in the SNC-Lavalin case not only breathes life into the idea that Wilson-Raybould was handcuffed by Justin Trudeau, it also paints a picture of a government that has abandoned any pretense of sunny ways.

Before I fall on my sword and admit the possibility that, just maybe, I could have underestimated Wilson-Raybould, let’s set the factual scene.

In 2015, Trudeau and the Liberals campaigned on the promise of real changeTM and the slogan “better is possible.” They promised open and transparent governments. They said that too much power had been concentrated in the hands of Stephen Harper and his office. They promised to reverse the trend of omnibus legislation. They said they would help the middle class. And they said they would bring about much needed progressive justice reform.

They sure did say a lot of words. But let’s look at the government’s actions.

Over the last three-and-a-half years, there has been little progress in fulfilling the criminal justice promises set out in Wilson-Raybould’s mandate letter. The national inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women and girls has been a bureaucratic nightmare. Sentencing reforms, including the promised roll-back of minimum sentencing, never happened. And there have been precious few measures to address the disproportionate impact of the criminal justice system on Indigenous, racialized, impoverished and marginalized communities.

However, in 2018, there was a brand new criminal law passed. It was never talked about during the election and it certainly was not in the mandate letter. But, nonetheless, the new-to-Canada concept of a deferred prosecution agreement for criminal offences was buried on page 527 of the 556-page omnibus budget implementation bill. The amendment was so well hidden that even Liberal MPs sitting on the House of Commons Finance Committee were caught by surprise. -Michael Spratt, Canadian Lawyer

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However, in 2018, there was a brand new criminal law passed. It was never talked about during the election and it certainly was not in the mandate letter. But, nonetheless, the new-to-Canada concept of a deferred prosecution agreement for criminal offences was buried on page 527 of the 556-page omnibus budget implementation bill. The amendment was so well hidden that even Liberal MPs sitting on the House of Commons Finance Committee were caught by surprise.

A law made specifically to help SNC-Lavalin avoid criminal charges.  THAT is REAL CHANGE?

Politicians campaign pretending to care about the voters when it actuality their heads are firmly planted in the genitalia of corporate Canada.  Its all about grabbing one of those cushy, high salaried seats on some company’s Board of Directors after their political life comes to an end. The “reward” for being a loyal, political whore.

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One Response

  1. casper
    casper at | | Reply

    Oh, say it’s not so. Rich corporations are running the world.

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